December 3, 2022

Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Bathyscaphe Flyback ChronoIn recent years I’ve taken to “pimping out” my new and old watches, some of them military watches, by replacing their original straps with colorful NATO straps. New releases from recent Baselworld watch fairs indicate that I may have helped start a trend: many new watches now have these military-style cloth straps as original equipment. In this article from my blog, Watch-Insider.com, I showcase 10 of these watches.

I started swapping out original straps for NATO straps a few years ago. At first, I purchased the straps from the Australian website www.natostrap.com. These days, I mostly buy them at MisterChrono, a retailer at 23, Rue Danielle Casanova near Place Vendôme in Paris, or online at the shop’s website, www.misterchrono.com.

I do not want to claim that my affinity for NATO straps influenced some of the product managers of these well-known watch brands, but who knows? In the case of at least one brand, I can claim some direct responsibility for the decision to use this type of strap: Blancpain’s Marc Hayek saw me wearing one in a meeting and decided on the spot that the brand would start using them. (One of those Blancpain watches is shown below.)

Where does the NATO strap come from and where did it get its name? Here’s a little bit of history for you:

The original NATO watch straps were created by Great Britain’s Ministry of Defence in the early 1970s and in 1973; they became part of the standard equipment available to British soldiers. They took their name not directly from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization but rather from the 13-digit stock number recognized by members of NATO (it is also referred to as the NATO Stock Number or NSN). The soldiers could requisition a strap by filling out a form known as G1098, which was usually shortened to G10. Thus, a member of the military who wore it did not call it a NATO strap but a G10. These first NATO straps were made of grey woven nylon, and their buckles and keepers were made of chromium-plated brass. One of their defining benefits was that the watch had a fixed pin ensuring that the strap would not break and cause the watch to be be lost. The great length of the strap made it possible to f it the strap comfortably around a uniform.

Original grey woven nylon NATO strap and plan

Original grey woven nylon NATO strap and plan

 

I don’t know for sure which watch brand was the first one to use them officially, but I assume it was Tudor. The Tudor watches have straps that look very similar to original NATO straps, but they are fixed to the watch in a different way. If you want to change them, you’ll need to take out the spring bars, while with a true NATO strap you just thread the strap through the mounted spring bars. The Tudor Heritage Chrono Blue from Baselworld 2013, shown below, is an example.

Now let’s have a look at 10 watches equipped with original (not replacement) NATO straps.

Tudor Heritage Chrono Blue

Tudor Heritage Chrono Blue

Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronographe

Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronographe

Chopard Grand Prix de Monaco Historique Chrono

Chopard Grand Prix de Monaco Historique Chrono

 <<< Previous page  <<< Previous page